Cave and Karst Science Vol 51 No 1: Speleothems, Shrimps and Fungus

Cave and Karst Science Vol 51 No 1: Speleothems, Shrimps and Fungus

The latest edition of the BCRA’s Cave and Karst Science contains five main papers, and a photo feature. It begins, however, with tributes to David St. Pierre, John Wilcock and David William Gill. The editors write that, yet again, it is their sad privilege to introduce and present words of tribute and celebration dedicated to…

Cave and Karst Science Vol 50 No 3: Biology, Archaeology and … Muons!

Cave and Karst Science Vol 50 No 3: Biology, Archaeology and … Muons!

The latest edition of the BCRA’s Cave and Karst Science contains six main papers, some shorter forum pieces, including meeting reports and photo features; it begins with a retrospective appreciation of Gerald Wilford. Many will not have heard of Dr Wilford, but the effects of his work reverberate throughout the work of the BCRA. Without…

Cave and Karst Science Vol 50 No 2: Caves, Karst, Archaeology and a Great Scientist

Cave and Karst Science Vol 50 No 2: Caves, Karst, Archaeology and a Great Scientist

There are five main papers, two short Forum pieces and a Photo Feature in the latest edition of the BCRA’s Cave and Karst Science, but it begins with an extensive tribute to the late Alexander Klimchouk. Alexander Klimchouk was undeniably one of the most influential cave researchers in the world and this well-deserved appreciation of…

Descent 293 – in sharp focus

Descent 293 – in sharp focus

Descent 293 is now published and without further ado, here is a review! There is one article in this issue that, for me, stands out from the others. But more of this later. The regular news pages contain a fascinating description of the exploration of a section of Easegill’s Pegleg Pot, which is normally flooded…

Caves of Assynt, edited by Tim Lawson and Peter Dowswell

Caves of Assynt, edited by Tim Lawson and Peter Dowswell

The Grampian Speleological Group (GSG), Scotland’s premier caving club, has a long history of producing guides to the country’s caves; indeed this is third edition of a guide that was first published in 1972. However, in another sense this is a new departure. Previous editions were very much home-produced, but this has been laid out…

Cave and Karst Science Vol 48 No 2: Chalk, more chalk, dogs and graffiti.

Cave and Karst Science Vol 48 No 2: Chalk, more chalk, dogs and graffiti.

The latest issue of Cave and Karst Science is dominated (the editors’ word!) by karst and caves within the English chalk. There are also, though papers on aspects of cave archaeology, including historic graffiti in an underground stone quarry and the excavated remains of domesticated dogs from a cave on the Gower peninsula. An informative…

Descent 280: an honour with a difference for hero Aussie cave divers

Descent 280: an honour with a difference for hero Aussie cave divers

, If you want to know why a couple of Aussie cavers have had two new species of cave spider named after them get your mitts on the new issue of Descent, which brings you caving news from around the world. Descent 280 should now have reached you by now, but if not, it’s time…

Descent 277: Why cavers are visiting Harry Potter’s bedroom!

Descent 277: Why cavers are visiting Harry Potter’s bedroom!

Descent 277 is now here. It’s yet another great issue from the Descent team with interesting and exciting content, including some great exploration stories. There is so much to tell that this issue has eight extra pages! We start with Newsdesk where, of course Covid-19 gets a mention or two. Probably the most useful is…

Review: Journeys Beneath the Earth, The Autobiography of a Cave Explorer

Review: Journeys Beneath the Earth, The Autobiography of a Cave Explorer

Dave William Gill (not to be confused with Dave ‘Icarus’ Gill) will be known to many cavers in this country – and abroad – as one of our leading ‘expedition’ speleologists. His CV reads like a Rider Haggard adventure story, embracing first descents into some of the earth’s most challenging and spectacular caverns and explorations…

Big rivers, maze caves and a Roman dog – the latest in cave research from the BCRA

Big rivers, maze caves and a Roman dog – the latest in cave research from the BCRA

A report on the big river caves of Papua New Guinea in the Nakanai Mountains and one on harvesting swiftlet nests in Sarawak by David Gill form a large part of this issue of Cave and Karst Science, along with reports on subjects as diverse as Northern Pennine maze caves and the hydrological significance of…